In the social media one repeatedly encounters the question of how one can give one’s sewing works a little individuality. There are countless possibilities here! Already when sewing according to instructions I can influence a lot by the choice of fabric. Embellishments such as ribbons and bows, appliqués and flounces also offer a wealth of options. Another very simple way to give the cut something individual is to use the keyword “sew collar”.

I have already shown you V-neck sewing here and T-shirt neckline sewing here two variants with many options. Today I would like to deepen the topic neckline and show two variations to the collar sewing, which somehow never come out of fashion: the stand-up collar and the Bubikragen. In my example, I sew everything out of stretchy materials. For fabrics with little or no stretchability, adjustments are still necessary!

Level of difficulty 2/5
(with these instructions even beginners can sew these two collars)

Material costs 1/5
(depending on material selection between 0,- Euro from recycling and 30,- Euro)

Material and preparation
Sewing the material selection to the collar

When sewing a collar, it is always a good idea to make it from remnants of the main fabric. As a special eye-catcher you might want to set an accent here and use a different fabric. Basically I would always choose a similar material here, i.e. if the main fabric is stretchable, the collar fabric should also be stretchable.

Why?

Because the different patterns are also adapted to the different types of fabric and the head might otherwise no longer fit through the neckline. This problem arises especially when a collar made of non-stretch fabric is sewn to a jersey top, for example. But it can also be problematic the other way round.

A top made of woven fabric without stretchability will most likely have a zipper sewn into the centre back, which you will of course have to take into account when creating the collar. Today I show the simplest methods by sewing everything out of stretchable materials.

Sewing the amount of material and the pattern to the collar

For the respective collar you need of course also a top, to which you can sew it. This requires different amounts of material depending on the cut. For the collar itself, however, you only need small pieces of fabric or leftovers. I also recommend reinforcing some areas with ironing fleece. For stretchy fabrics you should ideally use this fleece H609 (black) or this fleece H609 (white). If necessary you are also well advised to use Vlieseline H180/309 (black) or Vlieseline H180/309 (white).

Sew collar
The stand-up collar
For the stand-up collar, put your front and rear parts of the pattern together. Now measure the respective length of the neckline.

I sew a children’s dress in size 110 – in my case 10.2 cm in the front and 8.9 cm in the back.

TIP: Take a flexible tape measure to measure and set it up to get a correct value for the rounding.

For the pattern I draw a vertical line on an empty sheet of paper on the left side – this is my centre back (HM), my broken fabric. I draw a straight line at a right angle to it.

INFO: I used checkered paper, but you can also use smooth paper without lines or pattern paper.

First I measure the length of the back cut – away from the HM – and set a marker. This is where the shoulder seam will be later.

Starting from this point I measure my front length.

Sewing collar, instructions for stand-up collar, pattern part three

For the next step we need the collar height. For adults we usually take 3 – 4 cm. Since I have to sew for a child and the collar should remain discreet, I decided for 2.5 cm. So I draw a parallel line to my measurements at a distance of 2.5 cm at right angles to the fabric break.

Sew collar, instructions for stand-up collar, pattern part four

So that the collar stands up beautifully later and does not throw folds, we must consider now still the neck rounding. For this I measure 1 cm from my upper line downwards.

Sew collar, instructions for stand-up collar, pattern part five

Starting from this point, I now draw a freehand bow to my upper line, which measures about as long as a third of the front collar cutout.

TIP: In adults this bow can be drawn up to two thirds of the way.

From this point on I draw myself a right angle.

The collar height is of course also maintained here and so I measure 2.5 cm.

Then I lead an arc here as well, but this time to the lower line, which runs as parallel as possible to the upper arc.

TIP: The rounding with a curve ruler is particularly beautiful, but you can also draw such small sticks without hesitation freehand.

For cutting, please consider that you will need about 1 cm of seam allowance later.

At first you can cut out the pattern.

It’s done so far. But I want to have rounded corners at the front, where the two ends meet, so I draw a curve and cut the pattern accordingly.

Nun erfolgt der Zuschnitt. Wie bereits erwähnt mit 1 cm Nahtzugabe in doppelter Stofflage, da ich die hintere Mitte ja auf den Stoffbruch legen muss.Now the cutting is done. As already mentioned with 1 cm seam allowance in double fabric layer, because I have to place the centre back on the broken fabric.

TIP: With particularly thin, light or soft materials, one or both pieces should now be reinforced with the previously recommended ironing fleece.

To make sure that everything fits together correctly, I now mark my important “meeting points” with some incisions, i.e. places where the different fabrics should meet.

The first is the shoulder seam (between the front and rear dimensions), followed by the rear centre.

I put the two collar parts right on right (thus with the “beautiful” sides together) on top of each other.

Now the right side including the curves is sewn.

If you are unsure, it is better to put the two fabric pieces together before sewing so that nothing slips.

TIP: For this seam you can use a straight stitch as an exception, despite the stretchable material, as it will then be particularly beautiful. This seam is usually not stretched while wearing the dress and should therefore not tear.

Then I cut in the curves several times up to the seam, so that the fabric can lay down well after turning.

It is also advisable to cut back the seam allowance a little at these points. Then the collar is turned and ironed well.

In my children’s dress I have already sewn the shoulder seams together and marked the centre front and centre back with small incisions.

Now I put the collar from the outside on the neckline, starting at the centre back.

The following markings should now lie on top of each other.

The center back of the dress under the center back of the collar. The shoulder seams with the markings of the shoulder seams. The front centre with the two front collar ends. Now everything is sewn together in the same way.

TIP: I like to sew those that should be exact, preferably with the “normal” sewing machine. But because I also like it “clean”, I sew again with the overlock.

Now the collar only has to be folded up and ironed, then you are done sewing the collar.

Optionally it can be quilted again with a narrow edge. And the stand-up collar is ready!

The Bubikragen
For the Bubikragen you need additional documents and thus in sum more pattern pieces. In total, however, the pattern is already available and only needs to be extended. So it’s much easier than sewing a stand-up collar.

First I draw the neckline from the front and the back on pattern paper.

A few centimeters of height are enough in each case. Here I draw an arc parallel to the cutout in 4 cm distance.

I cut out these two pieces (once for the front, once for the back) and my documents are ready. The covers are cut in each case in the fabric break. The seam allowance is about 1 cm on all three sides.

TIP: For thinner fabrics and also for those that like to roll up, it should be reinforced with non-woven fabric.

I draw this pattern and add a rounding to the front.

Then my collar pattern is already finished and I can cut it out. The collar is cut twice, the outer part I would reinforce additionally with non-woven so that it lies beautifully on.

The two parts are now placed on top of each other right to right (i.e. together with the “beautiful” sides).

Now the right side is sewn – as already with the stand-up collar – including the curves. If you are unsure, it is better to put the two fabric pieces together before sewing so that nothing slips.

TIP: For this seam you can use a straight stitch as an exception, despite the stretchable material, as it will then be particularly beautiful. This seam is usually not stretched while wearing the dress and should therefore not tear.

Then I cut in the curves several times up to the seam, so that the fabric can lay down well after turning.

It is also advisable to cut back the seam allowance a little at these points.

I set markings on the shoulder seams and the back centre through small incisions.

Then the collar is turned and ironed well.

TIP: So that nothing slips when sewing together and the collar meets exactly in the middle at the front, I sew the two ends together by hand with a few stitches. Sew together here at least in the seam allowance area, better a little further. If you also like to use yarn in a contrasting colour, it will be easier to see later when you remove it again.

I only sew the two parts of the document together at the shoulder seams.

Then I iron the seam allowances apart and for a nice, clean finish I sew again with the overlock around the outside and iron this seam.

With my children’s dress I now also close the shoulder seams and iron the seam allowances apart.

I also mark the centre front and centre back here. Now I put the collar from the outside on the neckline, as it should be on the finished dress. If both parts of the collar are made of the same fabric, I would sew on the outside of that part with the underwire fleece. I start again at the centre back. The following markings should now lie on top of each other.

The center back of the dress under the center back of the collar. The shoulder seams with the markings of the shoulder seams. The front centre with the two front collar ends. Now I lay the cover over it and make sure that all markings, the “meeting points”, lie exactly on top of each other.

Now everything is sewn together in the same way.

TIP: I like to sew places that need to be exact, preferably with the “normal” sewing machine. But because I also like it “clean”, I sew again with the overlock.

Now all you have to do is fold the document inwards and iron everything, then you are done sewing the collar. Optionally it can be stitched again. But I would fold up the collar part and sew the garment fabric with the slip only underneath.

And already the Bubikragen is finished!

Quick guide stand-up collar
01. make a pattern according to the instructions.
02. cut collar part 2x in break.
03. fold right to right and stitch together the side with the arches.
04. cut roundings in the NZ – optionally shorten.
05. Turn and iron.
06. Place collar on the cut-out at the markings, sew on.
07. And done!

Quick guide Bubikragen
01. make the patterns and patterns according to the instructions.
02. cut collar part 2x to size. Reinforce outer part.
03. Reinforce the facing if necessary and sew together at the shoulders.
04. overedge the front piece if necessary.
05. sew collar ends together by hand – at least NZ!
06. place the collar on the cut-out at the markings.
07. Place the document over the collar and also pin it down, sew everything together.
08. iron and optionally topstitch main fabric and cover under collar.
09. and finished!

The Twister Pirate

 

 

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here